EARLY TALKS W/ NEMO LAKES

Nemo Lakes lives on a very different planet than all of us – including Tyler Simpson, his originator. Simpson has created Nemo Lakes in order to pursue his own musical passions while challenging himself on a new level, where his metaphorical persona precedes him. Nemo is simply the ego that Tyler himself is trying to control, speak to, and understand. This music is a look into the world that Nemo Lakes has created. 

With previous 2022 releases including singles “Piggy Bank,” and “You’re From Somewhere,” Nemo’s style has developed into a boisterous, unruly, hard-to-ignore sound. With a new project in the works, Nemo is tackling the growing scene. “I am not a rapper, a rockstar, or anything new. I am a collage of my past experiences, and here they live as separate entities, in my head, and on record,” said Nemo Lakes. 

We chatted about Tyler the Creator, touring Australia, and what’s to come for this young artist – read below to learn more about Nemo Lakes. 


EARLY RISING:

Tell me a little bit about Nemo Lakes – who is he to you? What is his origin story?

Nemo Lakes: 

My music is for putting my ego on a pedestal in order to cut it down, which I see Nemo Lakes as a vessel for me to do. Basically, just explore my personal development. It is a way for me to kind of separate everything. I personally want to be Tyler. I don’t want to be like, “Oh, I’m Nemo.”  I don’t like it when people introduce themselves as an artist name, I think it’s kind of pretentious. I want to be able to have my own thing. I use it as a barrier in general to kind of separate this whole artist side of everything from who I am as a person. And in addition, I think in the future, I’m going to have other creative projects where I have different names. This is me exploring myself and who I think I am and everything that comes along with that. 

ER: 

I think that’s a really logical thing to do. In the creative world, there’s so much you can play around with, why not have a different persona? A way to separate part of yourself from another?

NL: 

Exactly, if you have the opportunity to be someone different, I mean, why not? I love who I am, but I think the idea of being able to be a brash person on stage and be able to express myself in a way that wouldn’t necessarily be normal for me to do is so fun. 

ER: 

Right. I completely agree. How would you describe Nemo’s sound? 

NL: 

As with many artists, it’s just a collection of experiences and things that I’ve listened to in the past. I’d say that I’m an alternative rock act, but you have the hip hop element, you have the electronic and experimental elements that, you know, come from acts like Gorillaz. That is my biggest reference. I also listen to a ton of Brit rock and Brit punk. I think having a way to combine that with hip hop influences too, is the sound I’m going for. 

ER: 

I see the British influence for sure. What’s your earliest memory of making or creating music?

NL:

In eighth grade, I got a beat machine…but before then I used to be obsessed with this group,–this is a super deep cut. This group is called The Hood Internet. They made insane remixes. They would put ludicrous acapellas over Swedish pop music and create the most insane, weird mashups. I’d look on Youtube for acapellas and instruments, and then I would go on this mixtape app and lay this over and match the BPMs. That was the first time I was like, “I think I’m good at this, I think I can do this,” you know? Even though I knew nothing about music, it made me eventually get into producing.

I was so obsessed with The Hood Internet though. I made my Instagram handle the Hood Internet, and then I made it Tyler the Creator. I think that’s why Tyler went by @feliciathegoat on Instagram because in sixth grade, I had his name as my handle [laughs].  

ER: 

No way, you had just serendipitously made that your handle? 

NL: 

Yeah, I heard about Odd Future earlier, and then I found out I shared my name and my birthday with Tyler.  I was like, “Oh, I like this guy. He’s cool.” And then I typed in @tylerthecreator and it worked. And I was like, “What the fuck?” So I had that for a while, but I changed it to my name. Looking back on it, I should have sold that handle. 

ER: 

I had always wondered why he was @feliciathegoat. Now we know. 

So back to your music.  Congrats on your newest releases, both “Piggy Bank,” and “You’re From Somewhere.”  How are you preparing for your next single release? I understand you have a larger project coming out, right?

NL: 

Yeah, I do. I’m trying to do lyric videos for a lot of songs, with higher effort. I think that the art of the lyric video has kind of been lost. Not enough effort is put into it, people will just put lyrics on the screen and maybe a looping video in the background. I’m trying to have a performance within my lyric video, edit it, and create a pseudo music video, but it’s really cheap and low-budget. One of my friends hooked us up with a chest mount, and we just went around at night performing, and then we’re going to edit it all and then run it through a visual synthesizer. It’ll be cool. 

ER: 

That’s sick. Do you do most of this around LA?

NL: 

Yeah, I’m trying to do the entirety of the rest of my visuals in a five-square block radius in the neighborhood I live in. It’s cool because it’s where everything was made, you know?

ER: 

I like that a lot. Cities like LA, New York, are awesome places to thrive creatively. I love that the art behind the music can capture that. 

What’s your biggest musical or career goal?

NL: 

I was born in Australia and my whole family lives there still, so I’d love to do an Australian tour. I think the whole music scene out there is so sick and I think it’d be kind of a crazy homecoming. All my grandparents are still alive and having them see me perform live down there, I think that’d be super cool. 

Besides that, in the extremely long-term, I want to be one of those Rick Rubin-type people, where I’d go into sessions and help develop young artists. I think if I can get to the position where I can have, you know, artists for10 years and just have my own private label thing, I think that’d be super fun.

ER: 

I think that would be so fulfilling, too.

NL: 

Totally. If I can be as successful as Rick, and become a teacher or some type of position where I could mentor people and push people forward, I’d love to do that.

ER: 

I respect that. Last question! What are you listening to right now? 

NL: 

Well, I found it on @triple_J. This artist, Genesis Owusu was featured, and his song Black Dogs! has been on repeat for four or five days now. So awesome. 

ER:

I’ll check it out. Thanks so much for chatting, and good luck.

NL:

Thanks so much.

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